Wireless network at home

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Parents:

  • None.
Gerald suggested that I should tell the world (or at least fogo) how
cool I am. So here is a pointer for people wanting to do the same since
it's actually realy easy to do.

I have installed a wireless network at home. I have a laptop which is
connected to my cable modem and which does masquerading.

You basically can walk into the house, turn the computer on and request
an IP address by DHCP, and you're connected. Well, that's the theory. In
practice, it requires some configuration on the client side because I
don't have a base station advertising itself.

But it works. The drawback is that pretty much anybody can go around my
house and use my Internet connection, but I'm not too concerned about
that. I am planning to enable encryption to prevent that.

If people want to do the same, I described the system at:

  http://larve.net/people/hugo/2000/10/wireless-lan

Eric Prud'hommeaux replicated my installation using Debian install disks
and a tar ball of the whole system (it's only 40MB when gzipped although
Eric couldn't find gzip on Debian's rescue/root disks) pretty easily to
install one at home. Maybe I should make this tar ball available on my
site after removing a few passwords if that's useful.

Have fun.

--
Hugo Haas <hugo@larve.net> - http://larve.net/people/hugo/
- Hello, Mr. Thompson! - I think he's talking to _you_. -- Homer J.
Thompson

Re: Wireless network at home

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Parents:

On Tue, Oct 24, 2000 at 07:12:25PM -0400, Hugo Haas wrote:
> Gerald suggested that I should tell the world (or at least fogo) how
> cool I am. So here is a pointer for people wanting to do the same since
> it's actually realy easy to do.
>
> I have installed a wireless network at home. I have a laptop which is
> connected to my cable modem and which does masquerading.

It's awesome! I'm using it now with my laptop to type this on my
computer at home in Ottawa, with no wires to be seen.

I should be used to having a wireless net connection by now
since we've had them at MIT for the last couple years, but the
novelty still hasn't worn off, and shows no signs of doing so.

And having it at home is even better...

> If people want to do the same, I described the system at:
>
>   http://larve.net/people/hugo/2000/10/wireless-lan
>
> Eric Prud'hommeaux replicated my installation using Debian install disks
> and a tar ball of the whole system (it's only 40MB when gzipped although
> Eric couldn't find gzip on Debian's rescue/root disks) pretty easily to
> install one at home. Maybe I should make this tar ball available on my
> site after removing a few passwords if that's useful.

I can't wait to set this up at home. Tristen, want to dust off
your old '486?

I just need to buy a PCMCIA to ISA adapter [1] (I think) and an
extra wireless card, and away we go.

Anyone have recommendations of good places to buy hardware online
in Canada? (or, in the states with cheap shipping to Canada.)
Something like NECX or CDW, with a large, well-stocked selection,
good prices, and a usable web site?

[1] http://www.cdw.com/shop/products/default.asp?EDC=202230

--
Gerald Oskoboiny <gerald@impressive.net>
http://impressive.net/people/gerald/

Re: Wireless network at home

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Parents:

Gerald Oskoboiny wrote:
>
> On Tue, Oct 24, 2000 at 07:12:25PM -0400, Hugo Haas wrote:
> > Gerald suggested that I should tell the world (or at least fogo) how
> > cool I am. So here is a pointer for people wanting to do the same since
> > it's actually realy easy to do.
> >
> > I have installed a wireless network at home. I have a laptop which is
> > connected to my cable modem and which does masquerading.
>
> It's awesome! I'm using it now with my laptop to type this on my
> computer at home in Ottawa, with no wires to be seen.

What about the wires for the printer? Speakers? Scanner? CD-burner?
I'm looking around at my setup and the ethernet wires only make
up a small portion of the fire hazard that is my office.

- Ian


--
Ian Jacobs (jacobs@w3.org)   http://www.w3.org/People/Jacobs
Tel:                         +1 831 457-2842
Cell:                        +1 917 450-8783

Re: Wireless network at home

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  • None.

Parents:

On Wed, Oct 25, 2000, Ian Jacobs wrote:
> > It's awesome! I'm using it now with my laptop to type this on my
> > computer at home in Ottawa, with no wires to be seen.
>
> What about the wires for the printer? Speakers? Scanner? CD-burner?
> I'm looking around at my setup and the ethernet wires only make
> up a small portion of the fire hazard that is my office.

Well, it really depends on your configuration. As far as we are
concerned, the aim was to share an Internet connection knowing that the
rooms were not on the same floor. We didn't want to run cables all
around the place or use a drill. So wireless is perfect.

Moreover, we don't have any peripherals anyway, so we're free to wander
around with our laptops.

And finally guests are pretty happy to be connected easily. You should
have seen Gerald: he was as happy as if he had seen a rerun of a whole
season of the A-Team!

--
Hugo Haas <hugo@larve.net> - http://larve.net/people/hugo/
Marge, it takes two to lie. One to lie and one to listen. -- Homer J.
Simpson

Re: Wireless network at home

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Parents:

On Tue, 24 Oct 2000, Hugo Haas wrote:

> I have installed a wireless network at home. I have a laptop which is
> connected to my cable modem and which does masquerading.

I did the same but using two boxes, and I have a few problems :)
I have one box, doing ppp on one side and "normal" eth on the other side.
It is then connected via a hub to another box, in charge of the wireless.

The ppp box is doing ipmasq, dns, dhcp for the machines physically
connected to the hub.
The wireless box is doing dhcp for the wireless machines and is acting
like a router, ie: not doing masquerading
(yes I will document that ;) )
everything is fine except that when I use netscape on a wireless box,
connections tends to hang after the ppp is disconnected and the machine in
sleep mode (it was not the case when the machine was directly before the
nat box)
One other pb, when the wireless card goes in sleep mode, it wakes up with
the right settings except one... the channel :/

> Eric Prud'hommeaux replicated my installation using Debian install disks
> and a tar ball of the whole system (it's only 40MB when gzipped although
> Eric couldn't find gzip on Debian's rescue/root disks) pretty easily to
> install one at home. Maybe I should make this tar ball available on my
> site after removing a few passwords if that's useful.

yeah, linux-wireless-router project!

--
"Baroula que barouleras, au tiéu toujou t'entourneras."

Re: Wireless network at home

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  • None.

Parents:

On Wed, Oct 25, 2000, Yves Lafon wrote:
> The wireless box is doing dhcp for the wireless machines and is acting
> like a router, ie: not doing masquerading
> (yes I will document that ;) )

Interesting. However, you need a set of IPs in order to do that plus an
upstream router willing to listen to your wireless routing laptop,
right?

[..]
> One other pb, when the wireless card goes in sleep mode, it wakes up with
> the right settings except one... the channel :/

You can force the PCMCIA cards to be ejected/reinserted when the laptop
is suspended using /etc/pcmcia/apm.options (or something similar).

--
Hugo Haas <hugo@larve.net> - http://larve.net/people/hugo/
Ok children, today we're going to learn about a Japanese poem called
haiku. A haiku is just like an American poem, except that it doesn't
rhyme and it's totally stupid. -- Mr Garrisson

Re: Wireless network at home

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Parents:

On Tue, 24 Oct 2000, Hugo Haas wrote:

> If people want to do the same, I described the system at:
>
>   http://larve.net/people/hugo/2000/10/wireless-lan

For the ones who have peripherals and wants to have some machines sharing
wires, here is a small description of my settings, the page is still raw
but you'll get the idea ;)

http://www.raubacapeu.net/people/yves/2000/10/26-network

> Eric Prud'hommeaux replicated my installation using Debian install disks
> and a tar ball of the whole system (it's only 40MB when gzipped although
> Eric couldn't find gzip on Debian's rescue/root disks) pretty easily to
> install one at home. Maybe I should make this tar ball available on my
> site after removing a few passwords if that's useful.

And a bootable cdrom with a script to setup the beast would be very cool.

--
"Baroula que barouleras, au tiéu toujou t'entourneras."

Re: Wireless network at home

Replies:

  • None.

Parents:

On Fri, Oct 27, 2000, Yves Lafon wrote:
> For the ones who have peripherals and wants to have some machines sharing
> wires, here is a small description of my settings, the page is still raw
> but you'll get the idea ;)
>
> http://www.raubacapeu.net/people/yves/2000/10/26-network

In this document, you mention reading the Stronger IP Firewall (IPFWADM)
Rulesets[1] of the Linux IP Masquerade HOWTO.

If you have a Debian box, the ipmasq package is paranoid for you. :-)
It probably implements those particular rules (I'll check that if I am
bored).

 1. http://www.e-infomax.com/ipmasq/howto/ipmasq-HOWTO-1.90c-6.html#ss6.4

--
Hugo Haas <hugo@larve.net> - http://larve.net/people/hugo/
Independent films are those black & white hippie movies. They're always
about gay cowboys eating pudding. -- Eric Cartman

Re: Wireless network at home

Replies:

Parents:

On Tue, Oct 24, 2000 at 07:12:25PM -0400, Hugo Haas wrote:
> Gerald suggested that I should tell the world (or at least fogo) how
> cool I am. So here is a pointer for people wanting to do the same since
> it's actually realy easy to do.
>
> I have installed a wireless network at home. I have a laptop which is
> connected to my cable modem and which does masquerading.

> If people want to do the same, I described the system at:
>
>   http://larve.net/people/hugo/2000/10/wireless-lan

I finally set this up at home tonight, woohoo!

I am using a 5-year-old Compaq Armada laptop as the base station,
(built from parts of other old ones by Hugo, I think there are
pictures of that operation somewhere.) Its hostname is ralph-wiggum,
because it's so feeble.

Now I just need to get a better battery for my Vaio and I can
start working from the back yard. :)

--
Gerald Oskoboiny <gerald@impressive.net>
http://impressive.net/people/gerald/

Re: Wireless network at home

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Parents:

* Gerald Oskoboiny <gerald@impressive.net> [2001-07-20 02:25-0400]
> I am using a 5-year-old Compaq Armada laptop as the base station,
> (built from parts of other old ones by Hugo, I think there are
> pictures of that operation somewhere.) Its hostname is ralph-wiggum,
> because it's so feeble.

For the record, here are the pictures:

http://larve.net/people/hugo/pictures/2000/03/laptop

Talking about wireless network, I actually did some coverage tests at
my (future) new place, and it works really well, even in large houses,
and it covers apparently quite some space outside the building.

Someone (whose name will be kept secret) used some cool Windows
software in the Somerville/Cambridge area the other day and discovered
lots of (unsecured) wireless networks. It is a program which checks
for base stations, displays all the characteristics if it finds one,
and can even be hooked with a GPS to put that on a map and have
worldwide free wireless connection by stealing packets from others.

--
Hugo Haas <hugo@larve.net> - http://larve.net/people/hugo/
Hey, did you hear that? Sounds like a giraffe is dying over there.

Re: Wireless network at home

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Parents:

On Wed, 1 Aug 2001, Hugo Haas wrote:

> * Gerald Oskoboiny <gerald@impressive.net> [2001-07-20 02:25-0400]
> > I am using a 5-year-old Compaq Armada laptop as the base station,
> > (built from parts of other old ones by Hugo, I think there are
> > pictures of that operation somewhere.) Its hostname is ralph-wiggum,
> > because it's so feeble.
>
> For the record, here are the pictures:
>
> http://larve.net/people/hugo/pictures/2000/03/laptop
>
> Talking about wireless network, I actually did some coverage tests at
> my (future) new place, and it works really well, even in large houses,
> and it covers apparently quite some space outside the building.
>
> Someone (whose name will be kept secret) used some cool Windows
> software in the Somerville/Cambridge area the other day and discovered
> lots of (unsecured) wireless networks. It is a program which checks
> for base stations, displays all the characteristics if it finds one,
> and can even be hooked with a GPS to put that on a map and have
> worldwide free wireless connection by stealing packets from others.

namelessly,
http://rdfweb.org/people/danbri/NetStumbler.zip

or google for NetStumbler...

--*a*b*i

Re: Wireless network at home

Replies:

  • None.

Parents:

Dan Brickley <danbri@w3.org> writes:

> On Wed, 1 Aug 2001, Hugo Haas wrote:
>
> > * Gerald Oskoboiny <gerald@impressive.net> [2001-07-20 02:25-0400]
> > > I am using a 5-year-old Compaq Armada laptop as the base station,
> > > (built from parts of other old ones by Hugo, I think there are
> > > pictures of that operation somewhere.) Its hostname is ralph-wiggum,
> > > because it's so feeble.
> >
> > For the record, here are the pictures:
> >
> > http://larve.net/people/hugo/pictures/2000/03/laptop
> >
> > Talking about wireless network, I actually did some coverage tests at
> > my (future) new place, and it works really well, even in large houses,
> > and it covers apparently quite some space outside the building.
> >
> > Someone (whose name will be kept secret) used some cool Windows
> > software in the Somerville/Cambridge area the other day and discovered
> > lots of (unsecured) wireless networks. It is a program which checks
> > for base stations, displays all the characteristics if it finds one,
> > and can even be hooked with a GPS to put that on a map and have
> > worldwide free wireless connection by stealing packets from others.
>
> namelessly,
> http://rdfweb.org/people/danbri/NetStumbler.zip
>
> or google for NetStumbler...
>
> --*a*b*i

Anyone know of a linux equivalent?  My cable modem was out last night
and my plan was, if I couldn't get connected through it today, was to
go to downtown Portland, ME and see if I couldn't hop on someone's
wireless LAN.  Fallback plan was to spend the day in an internet
cafe.

--
Ted Guild <ted@guilds.net>
http://www.guilds.net

Re: Wireless network at home

Replies:

Parents:

Hugo Haas wrote:
>
> I have installed a wireless network at home. I have a laptop which is
> connected to my cable modem and which does masquerading.
[snip]
> If people want to do the same, I described the system at:
>
>            http://larve.net/people/hugo/2000/10/wireless-lan

Hi Hugo,

Gerald and I were at the QA meeting earlier this week,
and tried to set up a wireless network following your
instructions. We had only limited success. Gerald should
be able to fill in more of the details than I, but here
is what I recall:

- Gerald and I were able to have our Linux machines talk
  to each other, and we used iptables to do masquerading
  (Linux kernel 2.4.5; I had to recompile to have the
   proper support).  The iptables command we used was:

      iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o ppp0 -j MASQUERADE

  You might want to add iptables to your page since apparently ipchains
  is now deprecated.

- We had little luck with getting dhcpd to work on my
  machine. It was very flaky - it seemed to work once (i.e.,
  Gerald got an IP address) but after that, we only had
  success with static IPs. Here's my /etc/dhcpd.conf:

   subnet 192.168.1.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
      range 192.168.1.2 192.168.1.20;
      option routers 192.168.1.1;
      option domain-name-servers 18.29.0.200;
      option domain-name "localhost";
      option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0;
      default-lease-time 600;
      max-lease-time 7200;
      }

- The other machines around the table were a Mac (Karl) and two Windows
  machines. Try as we might, we could not get those machines to join
our
  network. However, they seemed to recognize each other (i.e., detect
  other cards, but no luck with IP addresses, etc.).

- We weren't clear on the significance of the ESSID and CHANNEL
parameters
  of the wireless interfaces. In the end, the config that seemed to
work was
  when the value of ESSID was "any" (and not, for example, "Chaos").
There
  was some question about whether ad-hoc mode was appropriate with the
  Windows and Mac systems. All of this part of the configuration
escapes
  me.

So, while we had minor successes, it was on the whole a frustrating
experience. Gerald and I had a little IRC chat going locally, but we
couldn't get everyone connected. Which may have been a good thing as
(1) it would have been a distraction from the meeting and (2) I would
have had less bandwidth for myself over the 56k line. :)

- Ian

--
Ian Jacobs (ij@w3.org)   http://www.w3.org/People/Jacobs
Tel:                     +1 718 260-9447

Re: Wireless network at home

Replies:

  • None.

Parents:

Alternative instructions for doing it from a Mac:

Turn on the airport (wireless card) and open the control panel (in OS X you
can have its status on teh menu bar or dock if you like, and do everything
from there).

In OS 9 select "software base station" and then start the base station (you
can change the network name/channel by editing the boxes).

In OS X select "Create network".

and away you go....

On Thu, 15 Nov 2001, Ian B. Jacobs wrote:

 Hugo Haas wrote:
 >
 > I have installed a wireless network at home. I have a laptop which is
 > connected to my cable modem and which does masquerading.
 [snip]
 > If people want to do the same, I described the system at:
 >
 >            http://larve.net/people/hugo/2000/10/wireless-lan

 Hi Hugo,

 Gerald and I were at the QA meeting earlier this week,
 and tried to set up a wireless network following your
 instructions. We had only limited success. Gerald should
 be able to fill in more of the details than I, but here
 is what I recall:

  - Gerald and I were able to have our Linux machines talk
    to each other, and we used iptables to do masquerading
    (Linux kernel 2.4.5; I had to recompile to have the
     proper support).  The iptables command we used was:

        iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o ppp0 -j MASQUERADE

    You might want to add iptables to your page since apparently ipchains
    is now deprecated.

  - We had little luck with getting dhcpd to work on my
    machine. It was very flaky - it seemed to work once (i.e.,
    Gerald got an IP address) but after that, we only had
    success with static IPs. Here's my /etc/dhcpd.conf:

     subnet 192.168.1.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
        range 192.168.1.2 192.168.1.20;
        option routers 192.168.1.1;
        option domain-name-servers 18.29.0.200;
        option domain-name "localhost";
        option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0;
        default-lease-time 600;
        max-lease-time 7200;
        }

  - The other machines around the table were a Mac (Karl) and two Windows
    machines. Try as we might, we could not get those machines to join
 our
    network. However, they seemed to recognize each other (i.e., detect
    other cards, but no luck with IP addresses, etc.).

  - We weren't clear on the significance of the ESSID and CHANNEL
 parameters
    of the wireless interfaces. In the end, the config that seemed to
 work was
    when the value of ESSID was "any" (and not, for example, "Chaos").
 There
    was some question about whether ad-hoc mode was appropriate with the
    Windows and Mac systems. All of this part of the configuration
 escapes
    me.

 So, while we had minor successes, it was on the whole a frustrating
 experience. Gerald and I had a little IRC chat going locally, but we
 couldn't get everyone connected. Which may have been a good thing as
 (1) it would have been a distraction from the meeting and (2) I would
 have had less bandwidth for myself over the 56k line. :)

  - Ian



--
Charles McCathieNevile    http://www.w3.org/People/Charles  phone: +61 409 134 136
W3C Web Accessibility Initiative     http://www.w3.org/WAI    fax: +1 617 258 5999
Location: 21 Mitchell street FOOTSCRAY Vic 3011, Australia
(or W3C INRIA, Route des Lucioles, BP 93, 06902 Sophia Antipolis Cedex, France)

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